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Fingers crossed Sinead O’Connor is oscar-nominated next week

Sinead O'Connor - now usually described in the media as "troubled singer Sinead O'Connor"

Why is no one talking about the fact that Ireland’s tabloid-darling Sinead O’Connor is on the longlist for the oscar for Best Original Song, and almost certain to be nominated? O’Connor performs “Lay your head down” on the soundtrack for Albert Nobbs, which sees Glenn Close playing a woman passing as a man in order to work and survive in 19th century Ireland.

The song has already been nominated for Best Song at the Golden Globes, losing out to Madonna’s “Masterpiece” from W.E., but won the Satellite award last November. Lyrics for the song are by Glenn Close with Brian Byrne composing, suggesting that if it were nominated we may be denied seeing Sinead perform at the show. This isn’t unusual though, last year a pregnant Dido was replaced by Florence Welch for the performance of “If I Rise” from 127 Hours.

Because Madonna’s song didn’t play until midway through the W.E. credits, it means it is not eligible for the Oscars. I think this means the main competition will come from Flight of the Conchords’ Brett McKenzie for his songs from The Muppets.

It would make for an amazing story if Sinead could overcome all the media attention and drama of the last six months to perform and potentially collect the oscar with Close and Byrne. Most recent stories include a second break-up from her husband John Reynolds, a war of words with showbiz journalist Paul Martin’s leading to allegations he had an affair with a thin Sunday Independent hack Niamh Horan, well-publicised suicide attempts and current hospitalisation for depression.

If only every "celebrity" was this rational and open when dealing with their mental health. Seriously.

The nominations are announced next Tuesday at the ungodly L.A. local time of 5.30am. Fingers crossed!

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Nigel

Nigel loves stupid films almost as much as he likes clever films. He'll watch anything but is usually drawn to documentaries, North American independent films, Irish cinema and gung-ho, balls-to-the-walls Hollywood blockbusters. Here's what he's been watching.